$100,000 invested in classroom upgrade

By Website Administrator | Jan 14, 2003

Several classrooms in Kettering's Academic Building got a face-lift to kick off the new semester, which began Monday, Jan. 13.

Several classrooms in Kettering's Academic Building got a face-lift to kick off the new semester, which began Monday, Jan. 13. Renovations of around $100,000 were completed in the Academic Building, including:

Room 4-305 and 4-306 - new tables and chairs, painting, carpeting and remove floor tile,
Room 4-101 - demolition of old projection room, construction of new wall, remove floor tile, new tables and chairs, painting, and carpeting,
Room 1-819 - painting and new carpeting.

"This is the first time that our general classrooms are not being equipped with desks but look more professional with tables and chairs," said Pat Engle, director of Physical Plant. "The Classroom Renovation Committee solicited the help of Terri Lynch-Farris's Ergonomics class to study available tables and chairs."

Engle got samples from several manufacturers and students ranked them for:

  • ergonomics,
  • maintenance,
  • durability,
  • comfort and
  • style.

Engle said the class broke into four groups and did their own assessments. "All four groups picked the same table (24" wide top,C-leg, modesty panel) but they each chose a different chair. In the end, the four groups got together, weighted their findings and provided a single chair recommendation, which is what we bought. We were not able to buy the tables from the manufacturer they selected because of cost and delivery problems but the table we purchased had the required attributes."

 

Engle noted that the carpet is different than what has typically been purchased in the past. "Vinyl tile is nice, but noisy and scuffs," she said. "Carpet has a professional appearance, but holds water which can result in mold, bacteria and stains. We got the best of both," she said.

Kettering's new carpet is vinyl backed (fibers are actually imbedded in the vinyl -- which is recycled old carpet). "This way, water will not pass through the backing and can be easily vacuumed up. It looks professional and softens the sound in the rooms," she explained.

Engle added that the improvements are just part of the renovations ongoing in Kettering's primary classroom building. Other changes include an $876,000 software upgrade in the General Motors e-design & e-Manufacturing Studio. More information on the upgrade is available at: http://www.news.kettering.edu/showpage