COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The course numbers 591 and 691 shall be used to describe special topics courses. Special topics courses are one-time offerings whose content is determined by current faculty interest. These courses may be repeated for credit when the course is run with different content.

The course numbers 597 and 697 shall be used to admit credit for transfer or guest courses that are not equivalent to existing Kettering courses within a discipline. These course numbers are not used for study abroad transfer credit.

The course numbers 598 and 698 shall be used to describe transfer courses taken as part of a Kettering University International Studies Program.

The course numbers 599 and 699 shall be used to describe an independent study course. Independent study is student-directed exploration with faculty guidance at an advanced level. This course may be repeated for credit when the course is run with different content.

ACCT-518 Accounting /Financial Concepts 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission

This course provides students with an understanding of how accounting data is developed and used by managers in making decisions. The course is divided into three sections. First, the Financial Accounting section discusses how basic financial events are recorded and presented in the accounting statements. Second, the Cost Accounting section discusses the nature and recording of manufacturing costs, development of overhead rates, job and process costing, budgeting, and control of manufacturing cost. Third, the Managerial Accounting section discusses profit volume analysis, relevant cost analysis, time value of money concepts, and capital budgeting.

ACCT-639 Managerial Accounting 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: ACCT-212 or ACCT-315 or ACCT- 518

This course is a study of the use of managerial accounting information for planning and control. Case studies emphasize the role of accounting information in the decision making process. Designing, implementing, and the use of planning and control systems to achieve the firm's strategies are emphasized. Ethics issues are also addressed throughout the course.

BUSN-659 International Business 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Second Year Standing or Instructor permission

This course provides an overview of the expanding role of international business in the world marketplace. Emphasis is placed on exploring the complex issues relating to the best practices in International Business. This course will use case studies to illustrate the major topics.

BUSN-689 Organizational Behavior 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MGMT-639

This class will conduct a comprehensive examination of different organizational behavior theories including the analysis at individual, group and organizational levels. Individual levels include perception, personality, and motivation. Group levels will include decision making, group dynamics and team building. Organizational levels will include communications, empowerment, leadership, diversity and cross-cultural issues. Experiential activities will include class exercises such as case studies, videos, and survey instruments as well as team and individual assignments.

BUSN-779 MBA Capstone: Innovation and New Ventures 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MGMT-659

This capstone focuses on the creation or startup of a new organization based on an innovation in product, process or delivery. Particular emphasis is placed on creating a new products or services in response to a human need, testing at several stages of the new product development process, gaining initial customers, gaining distribution, obtaining financial support and managing the new organization. This is a ―hands on‖ course where students will actually develop some new product idea and/or prototype, conduct various types of market research and write initial business plans. The course is flexible to support students interested in a variety of fields.

CE-612 Digital Systems Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This digital systems course covers the principles and practices used in the design of modern complex combinational and sequential digital systems. Digital logic design, analysis, simulation, and implementation techniques are covered. Fundamental algorithms underlying computer-aided design (CAD) tools are studied. Schematic diagrams, hardware description languages (HDL), and system-on-programmable chip (SoPC) design tools are used to specify designs targeted for implementation in technologies ranging from discrete ICs to programmable logic devices, ASICs and SoPCs. Topics in testing of logic circuits and hardware-software co-design will be covered. The course is accompanied by laboratory component that allows students to exercise the principles and practices learned.

CE-620 Microcomputer Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This advanced course in Microcomputer Systems covers the architectural features, design principles, development tools and techniques of advanced embedded microcomputers. The topics include architectures of contemporary 16-bit and 32-bit RISC microcontrollers (considering Microchip PIC24 and PIC32 as example cases for the practical development experiences), instruction set, addressing modes, software development & debugging, parallel and serial interfacing, interrupts, timer module, ADC module, etc.; The course has a strong laboratory component, which will be carried out on a microcomputer development kit with the latest family of 16-bit and 32-bit microcontrollers. Students will also complete independent projects or research assigned by the instructor on topics such as low-power micro architectures and power-aware computing.

Course Descriptions / 53

CE-622 Computer Architecture and Organization 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

The fundamental concepts in computer architecture and organization are presented. Laboratory assignments using VHDL simulation are a major portion of the course. Topics include fixed point and floating point computer arithmetic; assessing and understanding performance; control unit design; microprogramming; memory organization; cache design; a 32-bit instruction-set architecture; single-cycle, multicycle and pipelined CPU architectures; RISC architecture; examples of commercial computer architectures. An independent study or project will be completed.

CE-624 VLSI Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

Design techniques and basic theory of integrated circuit design are discussed. Topics include review of the semiconductor physics associated with NMOS and PMOS transistors; fabrication process; CMOS combinational circuits; memory cells; stick diagrams; layout techniques using CAD tools; circuit extraction and analysis. An advanced project is completed.

CE-626 Real-Time Embedded Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

Implementation and applications of real-time embedded computers are studied. Topics include the case study of an embedded real-time operating system, typical applications of embedded computers, real-time hardware and software interfacing, and real-time scheduling algorithms. This course includes a lab component with several short design projects and research-oriented final project.

CE-630 Logic Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course introduces several types of logic systems and their applications. Topics in asynchronous logic are covered, including design and analysis of asynchronous sequential networks, races, and various types of hazards. The course also covers ladder logic and its implementation in programmable logic controllers. Additionally, an introduction to fuzzy logic is studied, including membership functions, rule creation and evaluation, and applications. This course has a laboratory component that allows students to implement the various logic systems in hardware and software, culminating in a directed design project.

CE-642 Mobile Robotics 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course covers the fundamentals of robotics with an emphasis on mobile robots, which are intelligent integrated mechanical, electrical and computational systems functioning in the physical world. Topics include state-of-the-art technologies in mobile robotics, such as locomotion, sensing, control, communication, localization, mapping, navigation, etc. Advanced topics such as coordination of multiple mobile robots will also be explored. The course aims to provide both theoretical and practical experience to students through lectures and hands-on experience with real robots and simulation software. Students will also complete independent projects or research on current topics covering mobile robotics technologies and related fields.

CE-660 Massively Parallel Processors 4 credit hours

(This course is equivalent to CE-460)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor approval

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course introduces using massively parallel processors utilizing hundreds of processing cores, those typically used as graphics processing units, for general purpose scientific computing. Topics include the architectural differences between a GPU and a traditional CPU, decomposing problems to efficiently utilize GPUs, and performance optimization techniques, and case studies. This course contains a research project that allows the student to identify a data-parallel algorithm and compare the performance of its CPU and GPU implementations. Terms Offered: Even summers/odd falls.

CE-670 Haptic Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course provides the required theoretical and practical background to design and development of haptic systems. Haptic technology enables computer users to touch and/or manipulate virtual or remote objects in simulated environments or tele-operation systems. This course aims to cover the basics of haptics through lectures, homework, lab assignments, a term project, and readings on current topics in haptics. Through lab assignments, students learn to create haptic-enabled virtual environments using a haptic device. Topics include current haptic technology and devices, the human haptic system, human haptic perception and psychophysics, haptic rendering of virtual objects. Students will be required to complete projects or independent review of research topics with approval of the instructor.

CE-680 Computer Networks 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

Organization, analysis, and design of interconnected systems of computers are studied. Topics include the Open System Interconnection model; the Internet reference architecture; network topology; media types; protocols; Ethernet; routing; TCP/IP; HTTP, wireless and mobile networks, multimedia Internet, industrial networks; and Internet applications. Students will be required to complete projects or independent review of research topics with approval of the instructor.

Course Descriptions / 54

CE-682 Distributed Embedded Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE or EE, or instructor‘s approval.

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course addresses the most important topics in embedded systems operating in a network environment. Topics include: typical applications of distributed embedded systems, control systems, real-time embedded software, microcontrollers, sensors, actuators, rapid prototyping, network-based software, and dependability concepts. A complete commercial hardware and software development environment that supports rapid prototyping, and debugging is used in laboratory assignments and a term project to develop a complete distributed embedded application. Students will be required to complete projects or independent review of research topics with approval of the instructor.

CE-695 Graduate Research in Computer Engineering 1-8 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CE

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course is directed research towards a master‘s thesis. Students must take this course under the direction of a faculty advisor, and it is graded pass or fail. This course may be repeated for credit.

CHEM-561 Physical Chemistry of Energy Conversion 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM-237 or equivalent and enrollment in graduate engineering program; or permission of instructor

Topics covered in this course include chemical thermodynamics, combustion, solutions, electrochemistry, chemical, electrochemical and phase equilibria, and biofuels.

CHEM-635 Multi-component Polymer Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Undergraduate organic chemistry, thermodynamics, polymer science, rheology or Instructor permission

This course promotes understanding of physical property synergism in multicomponent polymer systems for material selection and design purposes. Examination of both qualitative and quantitative chemical composition/molecular architecture/ processing/engineering property relationships for multicomponent thermoplastic systems. I. Mechanical, rheological, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, surface and morphological properties of linear and branched copolymer molecular architectures, as well as polymer blends and alloys to meet specific performance criteria. II. Chemical interactions, rheological changes and engineering properties resulting from small molecular weight additives to polymers including plasticizers, stabilizers, fillers and reinforcements. III. Processing methods used in polymer additive compounding and polymer blend manufacturing including melt, solution and dispersion mixing, as well as reactive compatibilization.

CS-541 Web Technology 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: CS-461

The concepts, principles, issues and techniques for web technology. The main principles and protocols in internet, the key components in XHTML, JavaScript, PERL, CGI, Java Applets, XML. Web database applications using MySQL and PHP.

CS-571 Software Requirements Engineering 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: CS-471

This course is an in-depth investigation of the requirement and specification phase of the software engineering process. Topics include requirement determination, analysis and change techniques, requirement specification modeling with the aid of CASE tools, software quality assurance issues, walkthroughs and inspections. Case studies will also be presented and analyzed.

ECE-610 Modeling of Dynamic Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Linear algebra and difference and differential equations, or Instructor‘s permission

This course covers modeling, simulation, and analysis of multivariable dynamic systems. Increasingly, practitioners are called upon to develop and to analyze realistic mathematic models of electromechanical or other dynamic systems. Approaches to modeling a variety of dynamic physical systems are discussed using examples of dynamic systems taken from a variety of fields. These systems are simulated using appropriate simulation tools. Most of the course is devoted to the analysis of linear systems using now classical techniques: linear algebra, state-space representations, and the state transition matrix. The material on nonlinear systems emphasizes modeling and simulation.

ECE-620 CMOS Analog Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Knowledge of multi-stage amplifier design.

Minimum Class Standing: BSEE

This course explains the methodology of high performance analog integrated circuit design. Topics include: design of basic cells such as active loads, current mirrors, current and voltage reference; differential and cascade amplifiers; output stages; high speed, low noise, micropower, and chopper stabilized op-amps, co-amp frequency compensation, stitched-capacitor circuits, analog multipliers.

ECE-630 Advanced Digital Signal Processing 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: EE-434, MATH-408, or instructor‘s permission

Principles of optimum filtering, signal analysis, and spectral estimation are presented. Topics include: review of signal processing systems, the Discrete Fourier Transform, the Fast Fourier Transform, digital filter structures, optimum filters, multirate signal processing, adaptive signal processing, linear prediction, vibration analysis, wavelet theory, and signal processing applications.

ECE-642 Electric Machine Drives 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: EE-342, EE-424, or instructor‘s approval

Methods of controlling electric machines and their applications are discussed. Topics include solid-state devices; various switching schemes; types of drives; characteristics of motors; controlling motors including vector control; braking of motors; and dynamics of electric drives and applications.

ECE-648 Electromagnetic Compatibility 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Basic topics in electromagnetic compatibility or permission of the instructor

Course Descriptions / 55

This course studies in-depth classical and currents topics in the field of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). This includes signal integrity, high-speed digital design matching techniques, passive filter design, single and multilayer shielding, electrostatic discharge, high-frequency measurements, circuit board layout, and grounding methodology.

ECE-680 Robot Motion Planning for Industrial Automation 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: EE-582

Minimum Class Standing: BSEE

Robots are widely used in many modern industrial automation applications, which demands effective and optimized robot motion planning. This course introduces students to the world of robot motion planning with a focus on robotic applications in industrial automation. Students will obtain fundamental knowledge in robot motion planning as well as state-of-the-art technologies in this area. Hands-on experience will also be gained through simulation and programming practices.

ECE-682 Mobile and Wireless Computing 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: CE-480 or Instructor‘s permission

This course focuses on the topics of mobile, pervasive, and wireless computing and networking. Students acquire hands-on experience with wireless and portables technology, and learn about its applications and limitations. The course covers network protocols including mobile networks (Mobile-IP), and ad-hoc networks. Newly emerging computing models such as mobile client/server, wireless thin client, disconnected operation, and proximity computing are also covered. The course requires project work.

ECON-513 Micro/Macro Economic Concepts & Applications 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

This course consists of two modules: One in managerial economics and another in intermediate macroeconomics. The course is designed to serve as a prerequisite course for students entering graduate programs in management and related fields. Terms Offered: See course offering matrix

EE-524 Fuel Cell System Integration and Packaging 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: EE-424 or EE-322 and MECH-325 or MECH-420

This course will focus on the conversion, management, and control of electric power produced by 10kw-200kw fuel cells for both mobile and stationary applications. Special considerations will be given to packaging of fuel cells and motor drive circuits, thermal management and heat dissipation, bi-directional energy flow through the electric machines and motor drives, ultracapacitor technology, NiMH batteries, and control of high power motors. Emphasis includes design and packaging of high temperature motor drives for processing power generated by fuel cells and for conditioning power generated by these same electric motors during regenerative braking. Technical issues that are addressed include: control of the motor drives; heat removal from the fuel cell, motor drive semiconductor switches and magnetics; behavior of power semiconductor switches at elevated temperature; thermal design and analysis of the electronics package; noise generation in control systems by electric power transients and modeling of the power system. This course is presented from the perspective of the systems engineers that are responsible for the overall system design and integration of the power electronics, the fuel cell, the heat removal technology, and the electric machines to make a system that has an acceptable lifetime in a hostile thermal environment.

EE-530 Digital Control Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: EE-432

Control of continuous-time processes using computer-based controllers is studied. Topics include: design of control algorithms for implementation on digital computers; modeling of discrete-time systems; application of z-transforms; stability analysis; root locus analysis; controller design via conventional techniques; state-space analysis and modeling; and design of control systems using state-space methods. Implementation of real-time digital controllers is performed in the lab.

EE-580 Automotive Electronic Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: EE-320, EE-432 or MECH-430

Practical application of contemporary electronic control techniques to selected automotive systems, including engine control and chassis control systems, are studied. Topics include: basic coverage of electronic circuits, microprocessors, and feedback control systems; practical application of these principles to automotive electrical systems including power and signal distribution, electronic ignition, and charging and voltage regulation systems; automotive sensors and actuators, engine management systems, and antilock brake systems.

EE-582 Robot Dynamics and Control 4 credit hours

Corequisite: EE-432

Principles of robot analysis, design, and operation are presented. Topics include: coordinate systems, kinematics and robot dynamics; feedback, feedforward, and adaptive methods for arm control; vision and intelligence; and mobile robots.

EE-584 Wireless Communications for Automotive Applications 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: EE-430

This course includes the description, analysis, selection and design of wireless communication systems, particularly those for automotive applications. The topics of the course include familiarization with practical methods of wireless communications as well as development of skills necessary to assess and select a preferred method. Practicality and analysis of simple systems form the focus of the course.

EE-695 Graduate Research in Electrical Engineering 1-8 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in EE

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate

This course is directed research towards a master‘s thesis. Students take the course under the direction of a faculty advisor. This course may be repeated for credit.

FINC-619 Financial Management 4 credit hours

Course Descriptions / 56

Prerequisites: ACCT-212 or ACCT-315 or ACCT-518

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the role in the firm that is performed by financial management. The first half of the course focuses on the theoretical valuation of stocks and bonds and the capital markets in which they are traded. The second half of the course focuses on both the use of financial leverage by the firm and working capital management. The need for financial managers to provide both ethical and legal leadership for the firm is stressed throughout the course.

HMGT-609 Healthcare Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission

In this course students gain a broad understanding of organizational, financial and policy issues in healthcare delivery systems in the US. Students will apply core business skills and knowledge of healthcare unique functional areas in analyzing healthcare case studies. Students will critically evaluate healthcare issues and polices and their effect on healthcare system performance.

IME-540 Environmentally Conscious Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: None

This is a multi-disciplinary course that provides students with the perspective and skills (economic, managerial, ethical, scientific, and engineering) needed to critically examine environmental issues in product design and manufacturing and to arrive at viable solutions to these problems. Emphasis is placed on solutions that reduce costs and improve environmental performance. The course is open to engineering, science and management undergraduate and graduate students, and focuses on examples of environmental issues related to the goods and services produced by Kettering University‘s industrial co-operative education partners. The course uses case studies to introduce new concepts to students which are then reinforced through group discussion, guest speakers, laboratory experiences and other activities.

IME-563 Safety and Human Factors 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to an engineering graduate program or Instructor‘s permission

Discussion of the relationship between traditional safety engineering and human factors or ergonomics. Examination of man-machine interfaces relative to people‘s capabilities and limitations. Application of accident modeling or investigation and hazard analysis or control techniques. Introduction to mandatory and voluntary specification and performance regulations, standards, and guidelines.

IME-564 Ethics & Practice of Engineering 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to an engineering graduate program or Instructor‘s permission

The course deals with the professional and ethical consideration of an engineer in contemporary society. Discussions include the code of ethics for engineers, case studies on conflict of interest, team, engineering/management responsibilities, environmental considerations and professional registration. This class requires live weekly discussion.

IME-572 Introduction to Reliability 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH-408

Corequisites: None

This course is to provide basic knowledge and skills of reliability techniques that can be used by practicing engineers. The primary emphasis is on the problem of quantifying reliability in product design and testing. The topics include reliability definition and concepts, life testing and data analysis, system reliability models, and repairable systems reliability. Accelerated life testing will also be discussed.

IME-573 Advanced Quality Assurance 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-333, IME-471

This course covers the advanced topics of modern methods of quality control and improvement that are used in the manufacturing and service industries. It includes statistical methods of quality improvement, concept of variation and its reduction, statistical process control, designed experiments in quality improvement, and quality in the service sector. Taguchi and Deming‘s quality concepts will also be discussed.

IME-575 Failure Analysis 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301

An engineering materials analysis course emphasizing the interaction of materials and processing as they relate to product failure. Topic coverage includes fracture path analysis, fracture mode, brittle and ductile behavior, fracture mechanics, corrosion, and material process analysis. This course requires a laboratory analysis project.

IME-583 Industrial Engineering Concepts 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Minimum Class Standing: Non-IE SR or Graduate student with non-IE undergraduate degree

This course introduces topics pertinent to the practice and management of the profession of industrial engineering. The topics covered may include: Activity-based Costing and Quoting (ABC/Q), Material Requirements Planning (MRP), Decision Making, Ergonomics, Forecasting and Scheduling Techniques, Simulation and its use in Production Planning and Control, Inventory Techniques, Quality and Improvement, Supply Chain Management, and Value Stream Mapping.

IME-601 Fundamentals of Manufacturing Engineering 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program

This course provides a general overview of the field of Manufacturing Engineering. Topics introduced include: various manufacturing processes, materials, quality assurance, quality control, safety, ISO/QS 9000, process and facilities planning, project management, and lean manufacturing. This course is delivered entirely via the internet.

IME-603 Computer Numerical Control Machining 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-100, IME-301 or equivalent

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer numerical control (CNC) programming and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). The fundamental theoretical and operational concepts of machining are also presented. The course focuses on the programming of cutting operations;

Course Descriptions / 57

tool materials, selection, and uses. Significant topics include: G-code programming, Introduction to CAM software, Taylor‘s tool life model, Criteria for tool selection, and the Orthogonal Cutting Model. Laboratories use CNC machine tools for programming and cutting, and are designed to illustrate theoretical concepts and methods for solving practical engineering machining problems.

IME-604 Sheet Metal Forming 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301 or equivalent

This course is directed at the forming of sheet metal components including the materials and their properties, strain circle analysis, shearing, forming and special forming processes. Also included are discussions of lubrication, press design and operation, simulated forming processes, and tool materials. Students will be able to design sheet processing steps and identify sheet forming operations from stamped parts.

IME-605 Applied Statistics 4 credit hours

(This course is equivalent to MATH-605)

Prerequisites: Undergraduate (calculus based) course in probability and statistics

Students will study wide variety of probability models, e.g. Poisson process, Gamma, Weilbull and Gompertz distributions, their interrelationships, and applications to quality control and reliability. Inferential statics for one-sample and two-samples will include methods of point estimation (such as m.l.e.), interval estimation and power and sample size analysis for hypothesis testing, One-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis will be thoroughly discussed. Non-parametric methods and categorical data analysis will be studied time permitting. Computer packages such as MINITAB will be used for all applications and the analysis of data sets. Terms Offered: As needed.

IME-620 Design of Experiments 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-605 or MATH-605

Corequisites: None

This course covers topics in design of experiments. It includes linear regression analysis, ANOVA, introduction to DOE, basic designs, factorial designs, fractional factorial designs, blocking, Taguchi designs, and response surface methodology. Statistical software such as MINITAB is used throughout the course. Terms Offered: At least once on a live/tape basis and the rest via tape-delay basis. This is out of necessity and flexibility expected of the master‘s program.

IME-625 Business Dynamics 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: None

In this course, the student will study the dynamics of complex systems, particularly as they relate to contemporary Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing problems. Included in the topics covered will be systems thinking and the systems dynamics worldview, reliability of forecasts, and supply chains and transportation policies, all as they relate to contemporary manufacturing and lean manufacturing.

IME-627 Simulation of Facilities 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to an engineering graduate program

In this course, the student will study how several simulation tools can be applied to contemporary facility problems. Included in the topics covered will be integration of production flow from supplier to customer, with emphasis on Goldratt concepts, Quick Response Manufacturing, and Lean Manufacturing. The course will apply concepts of manufacturing to service facilities.

IME-630 Quality Systems Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-605 or MATH-605

Corequisites: None

Introduction to quality, the management system (focusing on customers, leadership, stratiegic planning, human resource practices, process management, performance measurement and strategic information management, building and sustaining total quality organizations), and six sigma (principles, statistical thinking, design for six sigma, tools).

IME-652 Designing Value in the Supply Chain 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: A first course in Probability and Statistics

Minimum Class Standing: Admission to Graduate Program

Students gain an understanding of the decision-making tools necessary to design value in the global supply chain from concept to customer. Quantitative methods are employed to aid the decision-making process of demand forecasting and enterprise planning for the purpose of increased profit and value to stakeholders. Basic concepts in strategy, forecasting, demand planning, inventory control and value stream mapping will be taught and utilized to enable the decision-making process to be based on quantitative metrics.

IME-654 Enterprise Resource Planning 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to a graduate program or Instructor‘s permission This course provides an understanding of the integrated approach to enterprise planning and its evolution from MRP I and MRP II. It describes the core structure of ERP systems and highlights the characteristics of emerging ERP based organizations. Various ERP tools and techniques are described and compared. The fundamental success factors in moving from traditional business functions to an integrated process-based ERP environment are introduced.

IME-656 Engineering for Healthcare Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Minimum Class Standing: Admission to Graduate Program

This course examines the technical structure of the healthcare delivery system and the role that industrial and systems engineering (ISE) plays in its design and improvement. Included will be how healthcare systems work in hospitals, medical offices, clinics and other healthcare organizations. Traditional ISE methods for improving quality, patient safety, and employee productivity and satisfaction will be presented within a systematic application of value chain engineering designed to produce lean processes.

IME-660 Design for Manufacture & Assembly 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-601 or instructor‘s permission

Course Descriptions / 58

A study of the current methodologies associated with product design for manufacture and assembly. Topics include DFMA overview, Design for Function, Design for Assembly Principles, BDI-DFA Manual Methodology, Creative Concept Development, and Concept Selection Methodologies. Note: Students who have taken IME-474, Design for Manufacture, or its equivalent are not eligible to enroll in this course but must substitute another engineering course approved by their faculty advisors.

IME-674 Quality Assurance 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-605 or MATH-605

Corequisites: None

This course covers topics in quality assurance. Specifically, it includes introduction to quality and quality philosophy, statistical methods of quality improvement, concept of variation and its reduction, statistical process control, and acceptance sampling. Statistical software such as MINITAB is used throughout the course. Terms Offered: At least once on a live/tape basis and the rest via tape-delay basis. This is out of necessity and flexibility expected of the master‘s program.

IME-676 Lean Six Sigma 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: A first course in Probability and Statistics

Minimum Class Standing: Admission to Graduate Program

This course examines techniques to maximize production efficiency and to maintain control over each step in the process. The structured problem-solving methodology DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) will provide the framework for the course.

IME-680 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-601 or instructor‘s permission

CIM is defined with current terminology and recent concepts. It includes the relationships among the three major functions - design, manufacturing and business. CIM examples, obstacles to development and future trends are covered. Flexible manufacturing is highlighted. Key components of CIM are explored with special emphasis on robotic automation and control through interaction with the environment, CAD-CAM link with numerical control, computer supervisory control, process planning and quality assurance. Concurrent Engineering will be used in process and product quality selection. Lean manufacturing principles will be applied. Communication and networking, the artery of CIM, will be studied in the context of data compatibility and hierarchical control. Manufacturing analysis tools will be used to plan and implement a CIM system.

IME-683 Elements of CIM for Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-601 or MFGO-633

This course is an overview of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems and how they are managed. Topics include management of computer-aided design and manufacturing, group technology and process planning, integrative shop floor management, and networking and database issues in CIM systems. Strategies for planning, implementing, justifying, and managing CIM systems are studied.

IME-684 Materials & Processes Seminar 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301 or equivalent

The first third of the course will be devoted to a review of the principles of materials, property measurement and management. The coverage will include the four major groups of materials metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. The second portion of the course will address traditional processing methods/materials interface and the technologies of contemporary manufacturing. The last third of the course will be devoted to exploring new and emerging technologies for the processing of materials.

IME-698 Master’s Project 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: At a minimum, must be in final term of classes for the program, and permission of advisor.

This course is the final project for M.S. programs in IME requiring a master‘s project as the capstone of the program. The project — as opposed to a thesis —will generally be performed for the benefit of the student‘s cooperative education employer. It will generally involve the application of knowledge acquired in the student‘s program and most likely will not require original research. A faculty member will serve as project advisor and will be the evaluator of the student‘s project proposal and final report.

ISYS-629 Managing an IT Infrastructure 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: ISYS-669

The student will learn about telecommunication fundamentals including data, voice, image and video. The course covers IT subject matter such as the concepts, models, architectures, protocols, standards, and security for the design, implementation, and management of digital networks. Other areas covered are the essentials of local area networks (LAN), metropolitan area networks (MAN), and wide area networks (WAN). Topics covered include security and authentication, network operating systems, e-commerce and associated web sites and practices, and middleware for wireless systems, multimedia and conferencing.

ISYS-659 Integrated Information System Capstone 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: ISYS-619, ISYS-649, ISYS-669, MGMT-619

This course focuses on the design and management of an overall organizational system consisting of three interacting subsystems: (1) the enterprise itself - its structure, core processes, and relationships with external entities such as customers, suppliers, and outsourcers; (2) the IS function and its role in marshalling information technologies and information assets to support the strategy of the organization, and (3) the information technology architecture consisting of the organization‘s networks, hardware, data, and applications. The student will learn how to integrate and synthesize these three aspects of the enterprise, how IT must be aligned with the strategy of the organization, and how to make appropriate choices about architecture in relationship to overall organization goals. Special emphasis will be given to the role of Service Oriented Architectures as a means of integrating multiple organizations.

ISYS-669 Enterprise Information System Models 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate Standing

Course Descriptions / 59

This course overviews information systems (IS) viewed at two levels: the strategic role of IS and a process-oriented view of the organization and its relationships with suppliers, customers, and competitors. We view processes as vehicles for achieving strategic objectives and transforming the organization. The major focus of the course is how organizations implement processes globally using enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM) Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) and social networks. The course also provides a brief IS infrastructure overview and addresses key IS management topics. Students learn about the ethical and legal implications of information systems.

MATH-601 Advanced Engineering Mathematics 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Undergraduate Mathematical Review

This course begins with a brief introduction to the complex number system. It continues with a study of linear algebra including vector and matrix algebra, systems of equations, eigenvalues, vector spaces, independence, basis and dimension, inner products and orthogonality, linear transformations, and norms. Several useful and important decompositions such as QR, SVD, and Schur will be studied, applications of linear algebra from various engineering fields are presented. It includes the usage of appropriate software.

MATH-602 Applied Statistics 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Undergraduate Engineering Math Review

This course covers introductory topics in applied probability and statistics. Specifically various but useful probability distributions such as normal, binomial and Poisson will be covered. Statistical process control covering all basic control charts and gage R & R studies will be introduced. The statistical software MINITAB will be extensively used throughout the course.

MATH-605 Applied Statistics 4 credit hours

(This course is equivalent to IME-605)

Prerequisites: Undergraduate (calculus based) course in probability and statistics

Students will study wide variety of probability models, e.g. Poisson process, Gamma, Weilbull and Gompertz distributions, their interrelationships, and applications to quality control and reliability. Inferential statics for one-sample and two-samples will include methods of point estimation (such as m.l.e.), interval estimation and power and sample size analysis for hypothesis testing, One-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis will be thoroughly discussed. Non-parametric methods and categorical data analysis will be studied time permitting. Computer packages such as MINITAB will be used for all applications and the analysis of data sets. Terms Offered: As needed.

MECH-510 Analysis & Design of Mechanical Assemblies 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-300, MECH-310, MECH-312, or equivalent, as approved by the professor

The main aim of this course is to integrate the concepts of kinematic & dynamic analyses to the design of machines and mechanical assemblies used in automotive, medical equipment and other applications. These include (but are not limited to) the analysis and design of reciprocating engine sub-systems such as, piston cylinder mechanism, steering linkages, window and door-lock mechanisms, over-head valve linkage system, flywheel, gears & gearboxes, universal couplings and automotive differential. Synthesis of mechanism systems used in medical equipment area will also be covered. Kinematic and dynamic characteristics such as displacement, velocity, acceleration and forces are analyzed by graphical and analytical methods. CAE tools will be used to perform kinematic, dynamic and stress analyses and fatigue design of these systems using CAE tools. Temperature effects will also be included wherever appropriate in the design. Several practical design projects will be assigned during the term of this course.

MECH-514 Experimental Mechanics 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301 or PHYS-342, MECH-300, MECH-312, MECH-330

The primary purpose of this course is to provide fundamental knowledge in the theory and practical experience in the application of mechanical engineering measurements. Viewed as a system, consideration is given to the performance, limitations, and cost of the detection - transducing stage, the signal conditioning stage and the final termination or readout – recording stage. Sensors such as resistive, capacitive or inductive are considered for the transducing stage. Signal conditioning stage emphasizes the use of a Wheatstone Bridge circuit, operational amplifiers and digital processing. The final readout or termination stage considers visual readouts such as analog or digital meters, charts or scopes in addition to memory devices such as computer hard drives and microprocessors. Nearly 2/3 of the time is spent on an approved team project that produces experimental measurements, which adds knowledge or understanding to some theoretical concepts or rhetorical inquiry. Course is structured so as to qualify as a capstone for cognate mechanical engineering students. Others may use it as a technical elective.

MECH-515 Failure and Material Considerations in Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Designing components that are safe and reliable requires efficient use of materials and assurance that failure will not occur. Even still, components do fail. In this course, students will be introduced to the techniques of designing for life and material considerations involved in that process. In addition, students will also study how to analyze those components which do fail, and evaluate safe-life and remaining life in a design through the study of real-life component design and current failures.

MECH-516 Introduction to Finite Element Analysis with Structural Applications 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-212, MECH-310, MECH-330

The theory of the Finite Element Method will be introduced. Applications of static and dynamic finite element analysis of real world mechanical systems will be performed. Commercial F.E.A. codes such as SDRC/I-DEAS and MSC/NASTRAN will be utilized.

MECH-521 Energy and Environmental Systems Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301 or PHYS-342, MECH-300, MECH-312, MECH-420

The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive capstone design experience in the engineering and design of energy systems. Students will work in design teams to complete the design of an energy efficient and environmentally friendly system for use in a residential or commercial building, a power plant, or any other system that requires energy. The course covers one or more of the following energy sources or energy conversion devices: fossil, solar, wind, tidal, hydro, wave, biomass, geothermal, alternative fuels, or fuel cells.

MECH-523 Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics 4 credit hours

Course Descriptions / 60

Prerequisites: MECH-320, MECH-322, MATH-313 or MATH-418, or MATH-423, or Permission of Instructor

This course includes solution methods to the Navier-Stokes equations in a discrete domain. Grid generation, coordinate transformation, discretization, explicit, implicit, semi-implicit, a variety of algorithms, post-processing, and interpretations of results are discussed. Solution techniques for compressible and incompressible flows, their applicability, robustness, and limitations are covered. External and internal flows with and without chemical reactions are also discussed. The learning process involves hands-on experience on grid generation, setting up a CFD code, post-processing, and a thorough discussion on the results. The students will work on a final project that is a practical problem of significant magnitude and importance to industry. This work must be publishable in the student‘s journal or presentable in a conference.

MECH-525 Introduction to Multiphysics Modeling and Simulation in Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-322, MECH-420, Graduate Standing

Corequisites: None

This course solves a variety of engineering problems with the aid of computational software mainly in the field of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Pipe flow, incompressible flow, laminar and turbulent flow, drag, and lift are subjects covered during the first part of the course. In the second part, topics in heat transfer are used uch as conduction in solids, fin design, convection, heat exchangers, and radiation. In a third part, selected topics in electrical conductive media and reaction engineering are also covered. This course compliments MECH-322 and MECH-420 and could be considered an extension of the two courses where problems are solved in 2D and 3D using computational software. Different types of meshes will be discussed, post-processing of data will be analyzed through graphical techniques, and graphical results will be compared to well known analytical solutions. Students will also complete a final project where both fluid mechanics and heat transfer physics will be used to solve practical engineering problems. Terms Offered: Fall, Winter.

MECH-526 Fuel Cell Science & Engineering 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM-237/238 or CHEM-361 or PHYS-452, MECH-325 or MECH-420

The objectives of this course are to introduce the students to and provide an extensive experience in the engineering and design of fuel cell devices. The course lecture will cover the five main types of fuel cells and their operational parameters and applications, efficiency and open circuit voltages. Other topics include: fuel cell systems, compressors, turbines, fans, blowers, pumps, DC voltage regulation and voltage conversion, fuels for fuel cells and methods of processing. Codes and standards of operating a fuel cell powered device will be presented as well as laws regulating the transportation of hazardous materials contained within these devices. Students will also study the design requirements for the introduction of fuel cells into various devices such as: golf cart, bicycles, laptops, toys, road signs, etc. The lecture is supported with laboratory experiences.

MECH-527 Energy and the Environment 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

This course covers energy conversion and conservation, fossil fuels, renewable and bio-fuels, solar, geothermal and nuclear energy, alternative energy (wind, water, biomass), hydrogen as an energy carrier, historical context of the technology, the role of energy in society (economic, ethical, and environmental considerations), energy forecasts and the trend toward a hydrogen economy. Public policy, global warming and CO

2

footprints and offsetting are also discussed. Several laboratory experiments including solar heating, ethanol production and wind energy will be included in this course.

MECH-528 Bio and Renewable Energy Laboratory 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MECH-320, MECH-322

Minimum Class Standing: None

This course provides an opportunity for the students to perform hands-on laboratory experiments in the area of sustainable energy. The fundamental principles required will be provided prior to laboratory experimentation. Topics covered include but are not limited to PEM and solid oxide fuel cells, energy storage in batteries and ultra-capacitors, heat of combustion and calorimetry, solar-thermal energy and photovoltaics, wind energy, ethanol production from corn and sugar and bio-diesel extraction from algae. A field-trip is also included as a part of this course.

MECH-529 Design and Modeling of Fuel Cell Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-322, MECH-420

Corequisite: MECH-422, MECH-526

A fuel cell is an electrochemical device that directly converts energy from fuels into electrical power. It has the potential for highly efficient and environmentally-friendly power. Recently, emphasis has been placed into the development of fuel cell systems for power sources including portable, APU, and stationary applications. The fundamental principles applied to fuel cells including the relevant electrochemistry, thermodynamics, and transport processes will be reviewed in this course. The primary focus will be on fundamental principles and processes in proton exchange membrane fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cells including modeling of both types of cells. An introduction to fuel cell stack design and system integration will be presented, in which the analysis and optimization of various components will be discussed. A survey of the cutting-edge issues including the future direction of fuel cell technology will also be conducted. Class projects will focus on the design of a fuel cell system for an application chosen by the students where teamwork will be emphasized. This course is designed to provide the student with the know-how to design a fuel cell system for a specific application of power generation.

MECH-540 Introduction to Internal Combustion Engines and Automotive Power Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MECH-320

The fundamentals of internal combustion engines (ICE) is an introduction to engine design with topics that include: air capacity, engine vibration, kinematics and dynamics of the crank mechanism, air cycles, combustion, petroleum and alternative fuels, engine electronics and fuel cells. Automotive emissions, government standards, test procedures, instrumentation, and laboratory reports are emphasized.

MECH-541 Advanced Automotive Power Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MECH-540

This course serves to expand student‘s knowledge of automotive power systems. Topics covered include detailed thermodynamic cycle analysis of various power cycles, emerging alternative fuels and power systems for automotive use (current topics include high-blend alcohol/gasoline

Course Descriptions / 61

fuels, gasoline direct injections [GDI] engines, hybrid electronic powertrains and fuel cells). Students are also expected to work on design projects which are determined by the instructor. Students are expected to work on projects leading to the development of presentations and/or technical papers for professional society meetings (i.e., SAE, Global Powertrain Congress, etc.).

MECH-542 Chassis System Design 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Dynamics and Vibrations

The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive experience in the area of automotive chassis engineering. Students will work in teams to complete a chassis design project applicable to passenger cars or light trucks. The course covers tires and wheels, brakes, suspensions and steering. A vehicle system approach is used in learning and application and the logic of vehicle dynamics and the science of improvement are integrated into the course content. Professional computer-aided engineering tools are introduced and applied in the areas of suspension design and overall vehicle dynamic performance.

MECH-544 Introduction to Automotive Powertrains 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MECH-212

Corequisite: MECH-312

An introduction to the performance of motor vehicles and the design of automotive power transmission systems. Topics covered include loads on the vehicle, evaluation of various engine and vehicle drive ratios on acceleration performance and fuel economy, manual transmission design and automatic transmission design.

MECH-545 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Propulsion 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Corequisites: EE-432 or MECH-430 or permission of instructor

This course is an introduction to the principles of hybrid electrical vehicle propulsion systems for Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students. A major emphasis of the course will be to broaden the mechanical engineering student‘s knowledge of electrical engineering so that he/she can understand the fundamentals of electrical motors, electrical motor controls, and electrical energy storage systems. The course is also intended to strengthen the knowledge of electrical engineering students relative to automotive powertrain design. With this background, the integration of these hybrid electric components into the hybrid electric vehicle powertrain system will be studied, including electric energy storage (batteries, flywheels, ultra-capacitors) and electrical energy production-fuel cells. Relevant codes and standards will be emphasized.

MECH-546 Vehicle System Dynamics 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-330

This course begins with an introduction of Ride and Handling concepts followed by the study of mechanics of pneumatic tires. Mathematical models for ride and handling are derived and presented. Vehicle ride and handling design criteria are demonstrated. Chassis design factors (CDF) and their effect on ride and handling are emphasized. Static, Dynamic and proving ground testing will be presented and demonstrated. Computer simulation design using software (e.g., Matlab, Mathcad, ADAMS Working model, sSnap, Car-Sim and others) will be used as an integral part of the course and for the two projects assigned during the semester. Overview on state-of-the-art technology and latest developments in the field of vehicle systems dynamics (e.g., SAE, ASME publications) will be part of this course.

MECH-550 Automotive Bioengineering: Occupant Protection and Safety 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MECH-310

This course deals with a discussion and application of the following fundamental concepts: (1) an overview of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; (2) basic anatomy and physiology of the overall human body; (3) introduction to injury biomechanics including rate, load, and acceleration dependent injury mechanisms; (4) overview of injury prevention strategies including a variety of air bags, multipoint restraint systems, and occupant sensing methodologies; (5) the basic structure and function of anthropomorphic test devices; (6) introduction to experimental crash simulation; (7) virtual occupant simulation using MADYMO or similar computational tools.

MECH-551 Vehicular Crash Dynamics and Accident Reconstruction 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-310

This course deals with a discussion and application of the following fundamental concepts: (1) 2D and 3D dynamics of vehicular crash, (2) application of linear and angular momentum principles to vehicular impact, (3) application of energy principle to vehicular impact, (4) estimation of crash energy from vehicular crash profile, (5) vehicular crash pulse analysis, (6) occupant kinematics, (7) dynamics of rollover and pole collision, (8) crash data recorder (CDR) analysis, (9) and special topics in accident investigation forensics.

MECH-562 Compressible Flow/Gas Dynamics 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-320, MECH-322 or Permission of Instructor

Minimum Class Standing: JR

The course includes the derivation and physical interpretation of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows. Analysis of one-dimensional flows with discussions on normal, oblique, and bow shocks. Sound waves and unsteady wave motion are also covered. The method of characteristic (MOC) is taught and standard JANNAF CFD codes is utilized to understand the compressible flows and shock formation and behavior. The study is then further carried out to nozzle flows and jet/shock layer interaction. The students are required to not only understand the conventional methods used to obtain solution for compressible flow problems, but also to be able to utilize CFD and experimental methods to obtain solution for complex problems.

MECH-564 Aerodynamics and Wing Theory 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MECH-320, MECH-322, MATH-305 or MECH-522, or permission of instructor

This course includes discussions on fundamentals of inviscid and viscous incompressible flows. Important topics in fluid mechanics such as potential flow, vortices, point sources, and coupling of inviscid and boundary layer flows are covered. Two and three dimensional wings (or airfoils) and some exact solutions to such flow problems are discussed. Semi-analytical methods for disturbance distribution on wings are introduced by perturbation method. The computational Panel method for two and three dimensional aerodynamics problems is discussed. Commercial computer programs are used to solve realistic problems in a three dimensional space.

Course Descriptions / 62

MECH-570 Computer Simulation of Metal Forming Processes 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301, MECH-212, MECH-310

Corequisite: MECH-300

The main aim of this course is to introduce some of the latest techniques for modeling bulk and surface deformation processes through computer simulation. This requires an integration of the knowledge attained in other related courses such as engineering materials, solid mechanics, dynamics, and computer-aided engineering. The computer simulations include sheet metal forming operations, rolling, swaging and the other bulk deformation processes. Modern high-speed computer aided design methodology is introduced to study the behavior of the material during metal forming process, including the study of the strain pattern. Commercially available one-step and incremental software codes such as Quickstamp®, and LS-DYNA® will be used for the course. These solution procedures along with limitations of the software will be discussed with emphasis on techniques in an applied manner.

MECH-572 CAD/CAM and Rapid Prototyping Project 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-100, MECH-300

Capstone design project course in which students acquire an integrating experience leading them from CAD of a part (designed using sculptured surface and solid modeling techniques), through rapid prototyping of that part (using stereolithography) and into mold or die design and manufacture, (using CAD/CAM system such as I-DEAS, Solid Edge, and Unigraphics).

MECH-580 Properties of Polymers 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: IME-301, MECH-212, MECH-300

This course begins with thermo-mechanical properties of commodity thermoplastics and includes a review of structure/nomenclature. The course then addresses: polymer shape and size, amorphous and crystalline states, Tg, Tm, rubber elasticity and viscoelasticity (creep). There will be materials‘ selection and design projects.

MECH-582 Mechanics and Design Simulation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials 4 credit hours

Prerequisites MECH-212, MECH-300

Minimum Class Standing: SO

This course focuses on the properties, mechanics, and design simulation aspects of fiber-reinforced composite materials. Topics include: constituents and interfacial bonding, microstructure and micromechanics, theory of anisotropy, classical laminate theory, material characterization, failure and damage, manufacturing techniques, composite structure design, and introduction of nanocomposite.

MECH-595 Automotive Seminar I 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Kettering has a partnership with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) to offer both a certificate in Automotive Systems, as well as, a graduate degree in either Automotive Systems or the Mechanical Cognate. This seminar course would be comprised of a total of 4 Continuing Education Units (CEU) from SAE seminars, which have been reviewed and approved by a faculty review committee, consistent with Graduate academic policy. The transfer of credit must be supported by documentation from SAE for each individual applicant seeking such transfer. This course is not open to undergraduates.

MECH-596 Automotive Seminar II 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Kettering has a partnership with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) to offer both a certificate in Automotive Systems, as well as, a graduate degree in either Automotive Systems or the Mechanical Cognate. This seminar course would be comprised of a total of 4 Continuing Education Units (CEU) from SAE seminars, which have been reviewed and approved by a faculty review committee, consistent with Graduate academic policy. The transfer of credit must be supported by documentation from SAE for each individual applicant seeking such transfer. This course is not open to undergraduates.

MECH-600 Engineering Mathematics with Applications 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH-204, MATH-305 or MATH-307, MECH-420

The objectives of this course are to introduce students to various analytical and numerical methods used in the modeling, analysis, and design of engineering systems. The theory and application of these methods will be introduced. Applications to real-world mechanical and thermal-fluid systems will be performed.

MECH-610 Mechanics of Materials I: Linear Elasticity 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces the general model of deformation and displacements; and, their application to linear elastic solids. The formulation of deformation gradients, displacement gradient, strain, and stress tensors will be discussed. The derivation of the general equation of motion of a deforming solid will be conducted. The general constitutive relation of elastic materials will be introduced. The linearized general deformation measures and constitutive relation will be utilized with the general equation of motion and compatibility conditions to develop the general theory of linear elasticity. The developed theory will then be applied to solve for the deformation and stresses of elastic solids under plane strain, plane stress and beam theory conditions.

MECH-611 Mechanics of Materials II: Nonlinear Elastic-Plastic Behavior 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-610

This course deals with the general nonlinear theory of deformation and its application to elastic-plastic behavior of materials. The linear elastic behavior will be reviewed along with its application to deformation of plates and shells. The geometric nonlinear deformation measures will be discussed. The application of the general equation of motion to nonlinear deformation of solids will be conducted. The nonlinear theories of elasticity and plasticity materials will be introduced. The nonlinear deformation measures and constitutive relation will be utilized with the general equation of motion to address the nonlinear deformation of elastic-plastic materials. The developed relations will then be applied to solve for the deformation and stresses of several nonlinear problems.

Course Descriptions / 63

MECH-613 Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-611

This course introduces the theory and application of nonlinear finite element analysis in engineering design. The classification and formulation of different nonlinear behaviors and computational techniques will be discussed. Material and geometric nonlinear behaviors will be studied. The computational techniques for solving the different classes of nonlinear problems will be formulated. These techniques include implicit and explicit methods. Commercial software will be used to apply the formulated algorithms to the analyses of nonlinear crash and metal forming engineering problems.

MECH-615 Engineering Optimization 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-522

This course introduces the general model of numerical optimization and its application to engineering design. The formulation and classification of the optimization problems will be discussed. The computational search techniques for solving the different classes of optimization problems will be studied. These techniques include single and multi variable, zero and first order constrained and unconstrained, linear and nonlinear search algorithms. The developed algorithms will be used to find the optimum solutions for a variety of engineering design problems.

MECH-621 Applied Transport Phenomena 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-322, MECH-420

The objective of this course is to introduce concepts normally not covered in undergraduate Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow. Concepts relating to advanced heat convection and mass diffusion, turbulent and laminar boundary layer flows with heat transfer and mass transfer will be introduced. Topics in advanced heat conduction and droplet evaporation will also be introduced. Heat transfer for internal and external flow problems will be considered. The relationship between fluid flow, heat, and mass transfer in engineering systems will be discussed. Analytical and approximate solutions to these problems will be presented.

MECH-622 Computational Heat & Mass Transfer 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH-601, MECH-522

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the use of numerical methods that are commonly used to solve transient, non-linear, three-dimensional engineering problems with complicated geometries. Analytical methods that could be used to solve these types of problems will be presented. Some of these analytical methods can only be used to solve problems with simple geometries and simple boundary conditions. However, numerical methods can be used to solve problems with complicated geometries and boundary conditions. Engineering problems involving several different physical phenomena simultaneously, such as fluid flow with heat transfer and mass transfer, will be considered. In this case, the governing differential equations are coupled and should be solved simultaneously. Methods on how to treat non-linear terms will be discussed. Moreover, the method of staggered grids and upwind schemes that are used to solve fluid flow problems will be presented. For transient problems, implicit and explicit methods will also be presented. The student will be required to write his or her own computer code to implement these methods to solve engineering problems. For very complicated geometries, the student will be required to use a commercial or existing code. The student will be able to relate the computer output to the performance/behavior of the physical system. The limitations and convergence/stability issues associated with these numerical methods will be discussed.

MECH-626 Hydrogen Generation, Storage and Safety 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Undergraduate Chemistry, Fuel Cell Science and Technology or Instructor‘s Permission

This course covers various methods of hydrogen production: water electrolysis using photovoltaics, steam reformation and partial oxidation techniques of various types of conventional and alternative fuels. Various methods of hydrogen storage – compressed gas, liquefied gas, metal and chemical hydrides and nanotubes are included. Codes for underground and above ground pressurized hydrogen gas storage systems and safety aspects are covered. A comparison is made between hydrogen properties and known conventional fuels such as, methane (natural gas), gasoline, methanol and ethanol. Infrastructure design studies, dispensing transportation, codes and standards are covered. A hydrogen storage/production/safety laboratory for experimental studies is planned to be a major component of this course.

MECH-627 Green Energy Conversion 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-320, MECH-322, MECH-420

This course covers radiant energy transfer from the sun and its application to solar exchangers. Basic theory, energy balances for solar exchangers, economics, and practice of solar energy applications are included. The concepts are applied to renewable energy systems such as solar heating and cooling systems for homes, businesses, and industry. Windmill theory and applications as well as system design are also covered. Data obtained on large scale solar and windmill systems will be analyzed and discussed.

MECH-641 Combustion & Emissions 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MECH-322, MECH-420

This course introduces the student to the basic principles of combustion and how to apply them to basic engineering problems. Various technologies of this field will be explored. However, a large portion of the course will cover the fundamentals of combustion. Topics relating to flame speed, flame thickness, flame spread, flame quenching, blow-off, stabilization, ignition energy, flammability limits, and flashback will be presented. Laminar and turbulent premixed and diffusion flames will be discussed. These topics will be related to combustion and emissions in spark-ignition and diesel engines.

MECH-643 Noise, Vibration & Harshness 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing

An integrated approach to the analysis of Noise, Vibration and Harshness of automotive engineering is presented. Techniques for evaluating the vibration and acoustic characteristics of vehicle systems are discussed. Then the principles of noise and vibrations control are presented through automotive applications.

MFGO-601 The Globally Integrated Manufacturing Company 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Course Descriptions / 64

This course is an integrated overview and introduction to contemporary global manufacturing operations. The focus of this course is the application of attitudes, skills, and knowledge required of managers, supervisors, and team leaders and manufacturing professionals in a cross-functional and cross-cultural manufacturing operation. After a brief historical overview of global, manufacturing, this course covers the following topics: global leadership, cross-cultural business communication, customers-across-continents, empowerment and cross-cultural teamwork, continuous process improvement, manufacturing metrics, policy deployment, ISO and QS 9000, computer integrated manufacturing, process re-engineering, international supply chain management, and theory of constraints. This foundation leads up to a discussion on the lean and agile manufacturing management. Students are required to use the concepts from the class to analyze their own work environment.

MFGO-603 Data Analysis for Problem Solving 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Knowledge of MINITAB software required

This course teaches the principles and techniques for collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating information based on data. Data analysis emphasizes the fundamentals behind designing data collection strategies that lead to useful information for problem solving and process and product improvements. Data analysis techniques include descriptive statistics, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, quality control, regression analysis, Chi-square testing, and experimental design. Use of statistical software will be made to illustrate important data analysis concepts with a focus on understanding the computer output. The project requirement is expected to enable students apply the data analysis concepts learned in the class.

MFGO-605 Global Human Resources and Supply Chains 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MFGO-601

This course focuses on three primary topics: cross-cultural business communication, international human resource management, and global supply chain management. Students will gain knowledge and develop skills in intercultural business relations and assess their own competency. International human resource issues include selection, placement, evaluation, training, leadership development, labor relations and expatriation. The final month of the course is dedicated to understanding global supply chains, how to make them successful, and defining the role of the supply chain manager.

MFGO-619 Six Sigma for Manufacturing 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: A first course in Probability and Statistics

Minimum Class Standing: Admission to Graduate Program

This course examines techniques to maximize production efficiency and to maintain control over each step in the process. The structured problem-solving methodology DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) will provide the framework for the course.

MFGO-633 Lean Production Systems 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: (MFGO-601 and MFGO-603) or ((MATH-205 or MATH-337, or MATH-408, or MGMT-521) and IME-601)

This course starts from the discussion of the evolution of the production systems, from craft to mass and to lean production. Principles of systems thinking and business dynamics applied to production systems are also studied. Contemporary lean thinking principles, lean enterprise development, and value stream mapping are studied and used in student projects. Modern enterprise improvement techniques such as Six Sigma, Theory of Constraints and Business Process Reengineering are also discussed.

MFGO-635 Work Analysis for Lean Production Applications 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MFGO-633

A critical issue facing most manufacturers of a product is the design of a competitive and low-cost manufacturing operation. In this course, work analysis will consist of the application of process analysis, methods improvement, and work measurement and ergonomic techniques to meet the competitive goals of a manufacturing company or office environment. The intent of this course is to survey the basic techniques of methods design, work measurement, business process analysis, and ergonomics. The student will be expected to solve fundamental and open-ended problems encountered during the design, analysis, or operation of a manufacturing facility (or an office) that produces a discrete product (or service).

MFGO-637 Quality Systems for Zero Defects 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MFGO-633

This course will provide manufacturing professionals with a variety of tools necessary for continuous improvement of processes. The course project will examine the student‘s personal processes and apply the tools to make concrete improvements in their day-to-day activities. The course then extends these personal experiences to the entire manufacturing and business environment.

MFGO-639 Quality Assurance and Reliability 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: None

This course covers topics in quality assurance. Specifically, it includes introduction to quality and quality philosophy, statistical methods of quality improvement, concept of variation and its reduction, statistical process control, and acceptance sampling. Statistical software such as MINITAB is used throughout the course.

MFGO-649 Metrics for Lean Production Improvement 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MFGO-635, MFGO-637

This course provides the manufacturing operations professional with an understanding of the data typically available within a manufacturing environment and how to use this information for improving those operations within the lean paradigm. The course covers basic financial accounting, activity based metrics, links to strategy, trend analysis and decision making. Student teams operate simulated companies in competition with other student teams to gain experience in applying the concepts covered.

MFGO-659 Integrative Capstone Project 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MFGO-605, MFGO-649

The course will establish a business-focused, project-oriented perspective applicable to the integrated manufacturing operating (IMO) environment. Learning about the principles and techniques that are within the discipline of Project Management will involve a focus on the body

Course Descriptions / 65

of knowledge recognized by the Project Management Institute. The IMO environment will be the basis for projects by student teams as they integrate their knowledge gained from other courses and professional experience. The project requirement is expected to enable students to apply the Project Management concepts and techniques learned in the class. In summary, this course will assist the students to become knowledgeable about and practice Project Management, its applications, and limitations.

MGMT--521 Statistical & Quantitative Methods for Managerial Decisions 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission

the objective of this course is to learn about the principles and techniques for collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating information based on data. Data analysis emphasizes the fundamentals behind designing data collection strategies that lead to useful information for problem solving and process and product improvements. Data analysis techniques include descriptive statistics, basic hypothesis testing, experimental design, and regression analysis. Use of a statistical software will be made to illustrate important data analysis concepts with a focus on understanding the computer output. The project requirement is expected to enable students to apply the data analysis concept s learned in the class. In summary, this course will assist the students to become knowledgeable consumers of data analysis, its applications and limitations.

MGMT-546 Project Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: None

Managing projects within an organizational context, including the process related to initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing a project. Coverage of the Project Management Body of Knowledge to support students seeking professional certification. Use of project scheduling software. Development of a project management plan for a student project.

MGMT-550 Management Concepts & Applications 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission

Both the art and the science of management will be introduced and examined through multiple perspectives within a global and ethical context. An examination of the functions of a manager builds upon the elements of organizational and behavioral theory. Principles of organizational structure and design will also be discussed. The importance of management in dealing with the complexity of modern organizations will be emphasized throughout.

MGMT-609 Technology Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program

Minimum Class Standing: None

This course is an overview of Management of Technology and Innovation (MTI) and its impact on contemporary management practices. The focus of the course in on the application of skills and knowledge required of managers and technology professionals responsible for technology implementation in a product development environment. The course analyzes the critical aspects of the management of technology and innovation at the product line, business unit, and corporate levels. Case studies and simulations are used to bring to life the critical challenges confronting managers of technology.

MGMT-619 Project and Change Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: ACCT-212 or ACCT-315 or ACCT-518

Managing projects within an organizational context, including the processes related to initiating, planning, executing, controlling, reporting, and closing a project. Project integration, scope, time, cost, quality control, and risk management. Managing the changes in organizations resulting from introducing or revising information systems. Identifying project champions, working with user teams, training, and documentation. The change management role of the IS specialist.

MGMT-629 Management Science 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH-205 or MATH-337 or MATH-408 or MFGO-603 or MGMT-521

This course provides the manager with a variety of quantitative techniques to facilitate the decision-making process. Both optimization techniques such as linear programming and stochastic techniques such as waiting-line models and Markov processes are covered. Emphasis is placed on the application of these quantitative techniques to a variety of managerial decision areas.

MGMT-639 Managing People & Organizations 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MFGO-605 or MGMT-350 or MGMT-550

The purpose of this course is to begin preparing students for management positions in high tech and manufacturing companies. In this overview course, students will be introduced to the most important concepts and issues concerning the management and leadership of high technology staff. Subjects include high tech leadership and communication, change management, lean thinking, HR issues, ethics and persuasion.

MGMT-649 Business Ethics and Leadership 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MGMT-639

The course prepares students for leadership roles in the workplace and in society by giving them knowledge of management and leadership from an ethical perspective. This course will focus on the evolution of ethical theories and the role of the leader within the business context. Students will use their understanding of business, leadership and the processes of moral reasoning to examine contemporary issues relating to organizations. Through lecture and case method, students will apply their knowledge of leadership to contemporary situations.

MGMT-659 Strategy 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: BUSN-659, FINC-619, MGMT-639, MRKT-679

The capstone business class focuses on the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of organizational policy and strategy from the perspective of the senior manager/strategy planner. Consideration is additionally given to information technology, global operations, ethics, legal perspectives and the functional level strategies of the organization. An integrative approach uses the case method to explore executive decision making in the global marketplace.

MGMT-661 Operations Management 4 credit hours

Course Descriptions / 66

Prerequisites: MATH-205 or MATH-337 or MATH-408 or MFGO-603 or MGMT-521

This course will provide students with an exposure to and an understanding of the core concepts and tools of operations management. These concepts and tools will be presented in a manner that will allow students to understand the fundamental importance of coordinated operational activities. The class will examine how to effectively integrate operations across all functional areas of the organization in delivering the combination of service and manufactured value required to satisfy customers. Recognition of the importance of adding value and customer satisfaction to the long-term viability of both for-profit and not-for-profit firms will be emphasized.

MGMT-669 Supply Chain Operations 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

Minimum Class Standing: Graduate Admission

This course provides students with a conceptual framework for understanding Supply Chain Management (SCM). The course covers concepts, trends and technologies that enable global SCM. Students will learn how customer needs, competitive advantage, operational measures and financial performance support successful implementation of SCM. They will also learn how operational activities including information systems, procurement, demand planning and forecasting, inventory management and logistics support organizational goals Students will use software and case studies to illustrate concepts.

MGMT-679 Leadership 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: None

This course will be a comprehensive examination of different leadership theories, with emphasis on relevant empirical evidence and application of the theories to case studies that involve leadership and group functioning. Students will thoroughly examine a professional review of concepts and apply their understanding through a variety of means. Ethics and persuasion are covered.

MRKT-570 Marketing Concepts & Applications 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission

Corequisite: MGMT-550

This course provides an overview of consumer marketing‘s role in business. Marketing Concepts and Applications are integrated into a marketing discipline that enables students to become effectively engaged in consumer to customer product and service related endeavors.

MRKT-679 Marketing Management 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MRKT-370 or MRKT-570

This course provides an overview of marketing‘s role in connecting businesses to other businesses. While this course will cover the basic Business Management topics, a special emphasis is placed on the best practices in market relationship management, supply chain management, and strategy development. Cases will be used throughout the course to illustrate various concepts and issues.

ORTN-600 Graduate Orientation 0 credit hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Acceptance

As a graduation requirement, all Kettering University graduate students are required to successfully complete this course. Terms Offered: All