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The results are in

The results are in

Jul 22, 2004

A Kettering professor recently participated in Advanced Placement Program Reading.

Kettering Associate Professor Jim Huggins of the Science and Mathematics Dept. received selection to participate in the annual reading and scoring of the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations in Computer Science this past June. Sponsored by the College Board, the AP Program provides more than one million high achieving high school students an opportunity to take rigorous college-level courses and examinations. Based on their exam performance for these courses, students may receive credit and/or advanced placement when they enter college. This year, Clemson University in South Carolina served as one of the host sites for reading and scoring activities.

Huggins was particularly pleased to assist in scoring the tests and connect with fellow faculty and teaching professionals from around the country. "It was a great chance to exchange ideas with other teachers and learn about what's going on at the high school level with regard to computer science," he said. During his seven-day work assignment, he was also able to make several contacts with high school representatives and talk about the Kettering brand of cooperative education. "Some people had heard of Kettering before, which was nice to hear," he noted.

Some of Huggins' responsibilities during his week working with the College Board included review and scoring of free response sections. For example, some questions required students to write small programs, which Huggins reviewed and scored. He and other examination reviewers also had opportunities to do some site seeing, enjoy social gatherings with colleagues and take in a minor league baseball game.

This year, more than 6,000 reviewers from universities and high schools evaluated almost two million examinations in 19 disciplines. There were about 150 reviewers for the computer science area of the exam working at Clemson during Huggins' week in South Carolina. Currently, there are approximately 20,000 students across the country who took AP exams in the computer science area. Kettering currently accepts credible AP exam results in history, English, biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, macroeconomics, microeconomics, physics and statistics.

The AP reading is a unique forum in which academic dialogue between secondary school and college educators is fostered and strongly encouraged. "The reading draws upon the talents of some of the finest teachers and professors that the world has to offer," said Trevor Packer, executive director of the Advanced Placement Program at the College Board. "It fosters professionalism, allows for the exchange of ideas and strengthens the commitment to students and teaching. We are very grateful for the contributions of talented educators like Jim Huggins."

To learn more about Advanced Placement examinations, visit www.collegeboard.com .

Written by Gary Erwin
810-762-9538
gerwin@kettering.edu