New building open house

Nov 24, 2003

The boxes are unpacked and the labs are in use! To celebrate the newest academic building on Kettering's campus in 70 years, the university is hosting an open house for faculty and staff from 3 to 4 p.m. and for the greater Flint community from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 10.

The boxes are unpacked and the labs are in use! To celebrate the newest academic building on Kettering's campus in 70 years, the university is hosting an open house for faculty and staff from 3 to 4 p.m. and for the greater Flint community from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 10. There will be tours of the building, lab demonstrations and refreshments.

Named in honor of early General Motors Institute supporter Charles Stewart Mott, the C.S. Mott Engineering and Science Center, the $42 million facility is located southeast of the Campus Center, has three stories and approximately 129,000 gross square feet. The building was originally built by General Motors Corp. in 1940 and known as Building 35. Chevrolet Manufacturing used the facility as a customer delivery unit. Early prototype work on the Corvette was completed in the building, which was later used by AC Delco and then donated to the University by Delphi Automotive Systems in 1996.

The first floor houses an automotive engine test cell, instrumentation and control equipment designed in collaboration with Lubrizol. The first floor also contains an undergraduate automotive design center, where vehicles for the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and other motor sport competitions are designed and fabricated. It will also be the home of a new automotive crash test lab and fuel cell demonstration and research facilities.

The second floor is the new home of Kettering's largest academic department -- Mechanical Engineering including laboratories and faculty and departmental offices. It is a 25 percent increase in space over the department's current facilities. A third floor was added to the structure for Chemistry laboratories and faculty and departmental offices. The chemistry program more than doubled its current space to 24,000 square feet. A feature of these facilities will be Bell Undergraduate Chemistry Labs named for Professor Reginald Bell, an outstanding teacher and mentor who has served on the faculty for more than 40 years. The third floor also has an undeveloped space that will allow for future expansion.