The need for speed

Jul 15, 2004

42 new PCs in updated lab provide the computer speed and enhanced resources students need to complete projects and assignments.

Speed is the word that describes the recent work of the Kettering IT Dept. Recently, IT increased the speed of the systems in the General PC Lab work by purchasing the latest and greatest in personal computers. These new systems and related resources will help students with homework and projects by offering enhanced computing capabilities. In addition, Kettering can transform the lab into two classrooms for courses that require computer support.

The lab, which is located in room 3-501 of the Academic Building, previously hosted personal computers outfitted with Pentium II processors, 128 megabytes of RAM, 6-gig hard drives and bulky 17-inch monitors. Following the recent update, the lab now boasts 42 computer systems that include the following: Pentium 4 processors at 2.8 GHz; 512 megabytes of RAM; 80 gig hard drives; 19-inch LCD flat screen monitors; and CD burners. According to Eric Hosmer, Windows(TM) systems administrator, and Jim Hamilton, Kettering's vice president of Information Technology, the new systems are more than seven times faster, require less work space and are more energy efficient that the previous systems.

Each system is loaded with Microsoft Office(TM)with Word, Excel, Access, Power Point, Mintab, Maple, Matlab, Visual Basic and Adobe Reader. The new PCs also offer USB ports that can interface with pen (USB Flash) drives. The USB hubs are available on keyboards and on the front faceplate of each computer for easy access by students. The lab, which is continuously in use by students during each term, will also receive two HP scan jet flatbed scanners by the end of July or first week of August.

The Kettering Student IT Fee paid for the new systems. This fee provides important funding for upgrades like this lab, which ultimately aids students in completing their work more efficiently and provides instructors up-to-datetechnology using systems currently relied upon by various industries today.

Gary Erwin
(810) 762-9538
gerwin@kettering.edu