Kettering University to participate in "Flint: City of Design"

By Website Administrator | Sep 7, 2001

Kettering University's Scharchburg Archives, along with Flint's Alfred P. Sloan Museum, the University of Michigan-Flint, Mott Community College, WFUM, Longway Planetarium, American Institute of Architects & the Flint Institute of Arts, will host a variety of exhibits, movies, lectures and walking tours.

Kettering University's Scharchburg Archives, along with Flint's Alfred P. Sloan Museum, the University of Michigan-Flint, Mott Community College, WFUM, Longway Planetarium, American Institute of Architects and the Flint Institute of Arts, will host a variety of exhibits, movies, lectures and walking tours Sept. 10 to Dec. 20 titled "Flint: City of Design." This unique collaboration offers the public an opportunity to experience activities and events that showcase the influence of the American modern design movement on the automobile in the 1930s.

Kettering's Scharchburg Archives will host the opening celebration for the exhibition Monday, Sept. 10, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Kettering's display, "American Modern Design and the Automobile," includes original color designs from the General Motors Art and Color Dept., which was established by Alfred P. Sloan in 1928 and represents the first design department developed by an automotive manufacturer. Kettering's Scharchburg Archives will display 36 original prints that feature design components such as doorknobs, handles, dashboard coloring, emblems and radiators. In addition, Kettering's opening celebration will feature a display next to the University bell tower of automobiles from the 1930s.

David White, archivist for the Scharchburg Archives, is particularly pleased to participate in "Flint: City of Design." "The material we will have on display will interest car enthusiasts and researchers because it offers a wealth of information about the design of vehicle ornamentation during the early years of the automotive industry," he explained. "But perhaps what is most significant is that this display, along with the creation of the Art and Color Dept. at GM many years ago, represents Alfred P. Sloan's view that cars must undergo redesign on a yearly basis to attract new buyers."

For more information on Kettering's "American Modern Design and the Automobile," contact the Scharchburg Archives at (810) 762-9661, or visit the Kettering web site at www.kettering.edu.