Fibromyalgia trial slated for Flint generates interest in medical collaborations

Fibromyalgia trial slated for Flint generates interest in medical collaborations

Mar 1, 2002

Nearly 1,000 people have applied to be part of the clinical trial for sufferers of Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain conducted by Dr. Jeff Hargrove, assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at Kettering University, and physicians at McLaren Regional Medical Center in Flint.


The latest information about the clinical trail can be found at www.fm-research.com

Nearly 1,000 people have applied to be part of the clinical trial for sufferers of Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain conducted by Dr. Jeff Hargrove, assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at Kettering University, and physicians at McLaren Regional Medical Center in Flint. The trial will test a new treatment process in the first clinical trial of its kind in Michigan.

Hargrove said the medical community in Michigan is enthusiastic about the trial. A researcher from Ingham Medical Center has contacted Hargrove and is interested in working with Kettering and McLaren. His focus is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in addition to Fibromyalgia, especially related to chronic systemic infections.

In addition, a health services organization in Michigan's Thumb Area has a large group of patients suffering from Fibromyalgia and is interested in collaborating. According to Hargrove, the Thumb Area has a much higher incidence of Fibromyalgia per capita than anywhere else in the world. "The reason why it is so high there is unknown," he said.

Other medical professionals have expressed interest in working with Hargrove and McLaren physicians to treat patients and establish a permanent treatment facility.

Symptoms of Fibromyalgia include full body diffuse pain, cognitive dysfunction and chronic fatigue. The disease affects women nine times more frequently than men. An estimated 4 percent of the general population is affected by Fibromyalgia, representing an estimated $2,274 per patient for health care annually. Total health care costs nationwide for fibromyalgia sufferers is between $12 and $15 billion per year.

Causes of fibromyalgia are generally unknown, although several pathological factors have been identified in research. Current treatments provide only a degree of relief and are generally ineffective over the long term. The new treatment draws on many medical disciplines and can offer successful management of chronic pain.

Read more about it at:
http://www.news.kettering.edu/showpage.cfm?p=3
http://www.news.kettering.edu/showpage.cfm?id=176

For more information about the clinical trial call the Mechanical Engineering department at Kettering University at (810) 762-9791.